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ECORP Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Species Surveys

ECORP employs a team of highly qualified biological resource specialists with the required state and federal permits to conduct habitat assessment and protocol-level surveys for dozens of species classified as special-status, threatened, or endangered by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), US Department of Fish and Wildlife (USDFW), and other state and federal environmental agencies.

ECORP Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Invertebrate Surveys

ECORP biologists work with other staff members to manage and restore various habitats including vernal pools where invertebrates like vernal pool fairy shrimp and tadpole shrimp naturally thrive. We also possess the required CDFW and USDFW permits to survey, collect, document, and protect other threatened, endangered, and special-status invertebrates from both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Some of these species include:

ECORP staff Biologist conducting vernal pool fairy shrimp sampling during the wet season
Biologist conduct fish rescue at Llagas Creek

ECORP Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Fish Surveys

In addition to invertebrates like shrimp, there are a number of vertebrate species that live solely in aquatic environments, including several special-status, threatened, or endangered fish. ECORP’s interdisciplinary staff possess the permits required to perform Wetlands and Waters Assessments and Delineation Studies to retrieve, document, and mitigate impacts to these fish species:

ECORP Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Amphibian Surveys

Amphibians like salamanders, toads, and frogs are capable of living in both aquatic and terrestrial environments, requiring unique survey methods that can effectively document amphibian species habitats whether they are on land or underwater. The biologists at ECORP are equipped with permits to survey, collect, identify, document, and protect these special-status, threatened, or endangered amphibian species:

In addition to these California amphibians, ECORP biologists possess permits to survey the Chiricahua Leopard Frog in Arizona.

California tiger salamander at Tesoro Viejo Project site in Madera
ECORP biologist handling a giant garter snake as part of a special-status species survey

ECORP Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Reptile Surveys

Reptiles are another species that can be either terrestrial, aquatic, or both. Among these, ECORP’s biologists are legally permitted to survey the habitats of several special-status, threatened, or endangered reptile species:

ECORP Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Mammal Surveys

ECORP places an emphasis on protecting human communities from pollution caused by new construction or facility operations. We also work hard to protect other mammal species and their native habitats with permits to survey a variety of special-status, threatened, or endangered mammals native to California such as:

We’re also permitted to survey the Arizona cotton rat and its natural habitat within the state of Arizona.

staff biologist Caroline Garcia holding a kangaroo rat in San Bernardino, California
A threatened juvenile Swainson's hawk being monitored by ECORP biologists

ECORP Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Bird Surveys

Beyond aquatic and terrestrial species, ECORP biologists also possess permits to survey the native habitats of various special-status, threatened, or endangered bird species throughout California:

Our staff also hold Bird Banding Laboratory Permits for Western Bluebirds and Tree Swallows from the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

ECORP Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Plant Surveys

Native habitats typically include vegetation of some sort. Many times, these plants and their native habitats may be labeled as “special status, threatened, or endangered.” They require a unique set of botanical services for preservation and protection. ECORP’s team of botanists, arborists, and biologists are able to provide these services because they possess:

ECORP Staff Biologists Hannah Stone, Daniel Wong, and Matt Spalding identifying plant species

Contact ECORP to Learn More about Our Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Species Surveys

Federal, state, and regional environmental regulations often require protocol-level surveys and habitat assessments to identify, document, and protect special-status, threatened, and endangered invertebrate, fish, amphibian, reptile, mammal, bird, and plant species. These surveys can only be legally performed by biologists with the requisite agency permits. ECORP’s biological resources department includes an in-house team that together possesses the permits required to survey diverse habitats and ensure the preservation and protection of dozens of special-status, threatened, and endangered species throughout California, Arizona, and Nevada.

If we don’t have a permit, we have the knowledge and expertise to reach out to acquire them from the correct Federal or State agency. To learn more about our Staff Permits for Special-Status, Threatened, and Endangered Species Surveys, contact ECORP today.